Intellerati Blog | Smart Sourcing. Genius Recruiting.

Best Practices in Executive Search Research and Candidate Sourcing

Intellerati Blog

Welcome to the Intellerati Blog for Smart Sourcing, Genius Recruiting.  The Intellerati Blog is designed to help make executive search and recruiting smarter. Smarter is better and so much easier.

Intellerati advocates for an information-rich, data-driven, mindful approach to executive recruiting for a whole host of reasons. It is the right thing to do and it is time.  Founded by an award-winning investigative reporter and TV journalist, we have witnessed the power of information and it is beautiful to behold. It holds the potential to transform recruiting as we know it. We believe executive search models should be updated. We believe conflicts of interest should be banished. We believe recruiting research and sourcing needs a serious upgrade.

We are not a traditional executive search firm or recruiting research practice. (That wouldn’t be very fun or interesting.) So if you’re longing for the same-old-same-old, walk on by. But if you’re seeking new executive recruiting ideas, talent acquisition perspectives, and new ways of doing things — we’d enjoy beginning a conversation with you here. We invite your comments.  We really do care what you think.  While we are pretty serious research experts, we will forever remain students and are interested to learn from you as you learn from us.

So pull up a chair. Check out a blog post or two. Then let us know what you think.

Why Name Gen is SO NOT Recruiting Research

Why Name Gen is SO NOT Recruiting Research

Really, name gen! Like there’s a such a shortage of names that the 100 million registered users on LinkedIn feel so alone. That’s like saying that brothers or sisters on the TV show 19 Kids and Counting just can’t get enough of each other or that the Octamom is lonely. Wait, she still is! I mean, really!

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The Dumbest Things Recruiters Do | Intellerati Blog

The Dumbest Things Recruiters Do | Intellerati Blog

The first dumb thing that recruiters do is treat passive candidates like active ones, a stance that mistakenly presumes intense interest, if not desperate need, for the job. However, I would add recruiters who do want to treat passive candidates differently often lack the right tools.

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Candidate Mapping: Never Get Lost

Candidate Mapping: Never Get Lost

Candidate or executive mapping — tracing the reporting relationships of prospective candidates you identify — is a powerful way to bulletproof talent acquisition. When you map specific teams at target companies out of which you recruit, you are raising your game by making sure you that your don’t miss talent that should be included on your list of prospects.

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Passive Candidate Sourcing: Deep Data is Best

Passive Candidate Sourcing: Deep Data is Best

Passive Candidate Sourcing: Deep Data is Best Passive candidate sourcing for candidates is difficult for corporate recruiting teams to scale.   The data is shallow: it rarely provides the depth of information needed to determine whether a candidate is qualified.  Details found in press releases, articles, on corporate websites, as well as in Twitter, Facebook, and in many LinkedIn profiles are often minimalistic, devoid of rich descriptions that speak to a candidate’s breadth and depth of experience and expertise.  That shortfall means there is still a great deal of research and recruiting work to be done to determine whether someone you’ve identified as a potential candidate is viable. It makes passive candidate recruitment laborious.  It also makes it difficult to scale. Deeper candidate data is often trapped in separate silos. Applicant tracking systems, resume databases, and job boards rarely play nicely together: they have little motivation to do so because so often they are owned by companies that are competitors. Consequently, so even though the candidate information is much more detailed and structured, it remains isolated, if not abandoned altogether. And that’s a shame, because all those binary zeroes and ones become much more powerful when two or more databases are brought together, a valuable lesson in computer-assisted research that I learned in my prior career as an investigative reporter. The Deep Data Advantage Boolean Blackbelt blogger Glen Cathey makes an important point in a SourceCon presentation called The Five Levels of Talent Mining. He  speaks of the need for “deeper, more structured, more searchable” data that would enable you to reach in and immediately pull out potential candidates that are spot-on, talent... read more
Preemptive Calibration: Determining Who Is Good

Preemptive Calibration: Determining Who Is Good

Recruiting research should develop qualitative information about passive candidates early on to reduce the risk of candidate implosion. Quite simply, you must insert a step in your sourcing process to calibrate or pre-reference candidates to determine who’s got sterling reputations and who’s got rusted ones.

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LinkedIn Disappearing Rapportive Today | Intellerati Blog

LinkedIn Disappearing Rapportive Today | Intellerati Blog

LinkedIn Disappearing Google Apps Gadget A Rapportive application will vanish from the inboxes of its some Rapportive users sometime today.  July 31 is the deadline.  LinkedIn acquired Rapportive back in 2o12. In June of this year, it quietly announced it was eliminating the Rapportive Google Apps gadget “to simplify the experience”.  Journalist Harrison Weber of Venture Beat weighed in with the following: LinkedIn kills off Rapportive features to ‘simplify’ the experience Back in June, Weber’s article inspired a slew of comments from concerned Rapportive users: Simplify? Does anyone really find Rapportive too complicated? Honestly, you just install it and it works. No need to take away features from power users. So with today’s deadline looming , I sent up a flare in a blog post yesterday warning users that a Rapportive Google App was going away.  Only thing is I wasn’t entirely sure which one.  LinkedIn’s announcement did not make that clear: Changes to Rapportive: Rapportive Raplets, Notes, and Contextual Gadget to be discontinued. At LinkedIn, we want to provide a simple and useful experience for members like you. From time to time, we take a closer look at how our features are being used by our members. On July 31, 2014, we’ll be removing 3 features from our Rapportive experience: Raplets, Notes, and the Rapportive contextual gadget for Google Apps. Since I use Rapportive inside Google Apps gmail and since the application provided “context”, I initially feared that my app was at risk of becoming extinct.  That’s not the case.  The Chrome extension version called Rapportive is not going away. Rapportive App That is NOT Going Away What was confusing about the LinkedIn’s announcement is that it didn’t provide the... read more
LinkedIn Banishing Rapportive Tomorrow | Intellerati Blog

LinkedIn Banishing Rapportive Tomorrow | Intellerati Blog

LinkedIn Banishing Rapportive From Google Apps Rapportive is a genius Google Apps application that actually found a way to make social networking easier.  To date, that has not been an easy thing to do. But somehow Rapportive nailed it.  Installed as a browser extension, the Gmail app searches for social network profiles that contain the email address of the email you happen to be reading.  Rapportive returns a mashup of the existing profiles.  Not only that, Rapportive makes it easy to friend, connect, and follow that individual. You can invite the person to socialize with the simple click of a button.   More important, Rapportive appealed to nerdier users who discovered it could be used for email verification. As Boolean Blackbelt Blogger Glen Cathey pointed out to recruiters and internet sourcers, Rapportive verifies an email address when it returns the social profiles and profile photo of the person you’re trying to reach as shown in the screenshot below.   Well, my friends, as of tomorrow a Rapportive app that sits inside Gmail will be gone for good.  LinkedIn says it is doing away with the “Rapportive contextual gadget for Google Apps”.  LinkedIn’s  announcement spells out the social network’s reasoning. Changes to Rapportive: Rapportive Raplets, Notes, and Contextual Gadget to be discontinued At LinkedIn, we want to provide a simple and useful experience for members like you. From time to time, we take a closer look at how our features are being used by our members. On July 31, 2014, we’ll be removing 3 features from our Rapportive experience: Raplets, Notes, and the Rapportive contextual gadget for Google Apps. Please note: We are only removing these 3 features. Rapportive will continue to... read more
The Hidden Cost of Corporate Executive Search

The Hidden Cost of Corporate Executive Search

The Hidden Cost of Bringing Executive Search Inside Some corporations are questioning their decision to bring executive search inside. Over the past few years, more large Fortune 500 corporations with a steady flow of executive searches have implemented the executive search function. They have created in-house executive search firms —  teams that typically are led by former retained search partners. Not to be left behind, mid-sized and small companies have been conducting more executive searches themselves. While they lack the volume to justify standing up an internal executive recruiting team, a growing number of smaller companies simply task internal recruiters to fill executive openings as they arise. However, there is trouble in paradise. While the internal executive search teams have delivered huge savings in executive search fees, there is a discovered a troubling downside they were not prepared to see — an hidden opportunity cost. The Opportunity Cost of Internal Executive Search Teams This year, several CEOs and C-level executives have confided that in the rush to bring executive search inside, something was lost along the way.  Senior-level talent acquisition now feels disconnected from strategy. Worse, it  lacks a competitive advantage. Corporate executive recruiting teams are simply too busy with the day-to-day to do more strategic work.  In fact, many newly-minted executive recruiting  teams lack the budget for research and other resources that their colleagues on the retained search firm side enjoy. Making matters worse,  the technologies and solutions that were supposed to make executive recruiting easier have, in many ways, made it more complicated. As a result, while the benefits of  internal executive search teams are many,  all too often corporate executive recruiters are too overstretched to recruit strategically. There simply are not enough hours in the day. Despite the best of intentions and Herculean efforts... read more
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