Skip to content

Executive Recruitment Research

Executive Recruitment Research is also known as candidate sourcing and unbundled executive search. It is research that focuses on the part of the executive recruiting process where in-house executive searchers need help the most. The research identifies, profiles, contacts, and qualifies ideal candidates for specific executive searches.

The research supports executive recruiting for senior executive leadership at the VP level and above. Executive recruiting focuses on filling openings with titles that include Vice President, Senior Vice President, Executive Vice President, and all C-Level roles. C-suite roles include Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Chief Financial Officer (CFO), Chief Marketing Officer (CMO), Chief Revenue Officer (CRO), Chief People Officer (CPO), Chief Technology Officer (CTO), and Chief Information Officer(CIO).

Candidate sourcing research is conducted by executive search research firms. Services include executive talent mapping, org charts, passive candidate sourcing, candidate identification, executive profiling, candidate development, full-cycle recruiting, talent ecosystem studies, human capital intelligence, and other forms of custom recruitment research.

Intellerati named a Top 50 Connecticut Woman Owned Business

Intellerati Top 50 Connecticut Woman-Owned Business

The Good Search, LLC has been named to DiversityBusiness.com’s Top 100 Diversity Owned Businesses in Connecticut 2012 and Top 50 Women Owned Businesses in Connecticut 2012. Recognized as one of Connecticut’s “Top Entrepreneurs”, the DiversityBusiness.com awards recognize The Good Search for its overall leadership and economic achievements. Intellerati is the research brand and division of The Good Search, LLC.

top-secret executive search

Top-Secret Executive Search Case Study

A technology giant engaged Intellerati to fill a mission-critical opening for which failure was not an option. The engagement was the ultimate needle-in-a-haystack search.  In fact, our client informed us that it had “no idea where in the world the ideal candidate might be located or whether the candidate even exists.”